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Category: food laws

Dr. Mark Hyman: Here’s How the Food Pyramid Should Look – EcoWatch

Dr. Mark Hyman: Here’s How the Food Pyramid Should Look – EcoWatch

 

Dr. Hyman came up with his own Food Pyramid, to help you make healthier food choices.

Source: Dr. Mark Hyman: Here’s How the Food Pyramid Should Look – EcoWatch

The Food Pyramid may be the single worst thing to happen to health in America. As Dr. Mark Hyman explains,

At the base of the pyramid were carbohydrates, particularly refined carbohydrates like breads, pasta, rice and cereals, of which we were told to eat six to 11 servings a day.

These carbohydrates break down to sugar, which gets stored in your body as fat. In addition to the 152 pounds of sugar we eat every year, we’re getting 146 pounds of flour that also breaks down into sugar. Altogether, that’s nearly a pound of sugar and flour combined for every American, every day! That’s a pharmacologic dose of sugar.

We were also told told to cut out as much fat as possible, including healthy fats. But our bodies and our brains require fat to function properly. And, instead of going for foods that are naturally low in fats, people went straight for the low-fat and “fat-free” substitutes that food manufacturers were more than happy to supply.

And what’s wrong with low fat and fat free versions? Well, for starters, they have to replace the fat with something to maintain texture and flavor. Those replacements are typical sugar, salt, and other additives that you don’t want in your food.

If you don’t want to go read the article, you can watch the video.


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Pasteurized milk 150 times more contaminated with blood, pus and feces than fresh milk – videos the CDC won’t show you

Pasteurized milk 150 times more contaminated with blood, pus and feces than fresh milk – videos the CDC won’t show you

Pasteurized milk 150 times more contaminated with blood, pus and feces than fresh milk – videos the CDC won’t show you

@BobbyElectric brought this to my attention. I thought it was a necesary followup to my last post and important enough to post right away.

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SWAT Team Conducts Food Raid on Ohio Co-Op

SWAT Team Conducts Food Raid on Ohio Co-Op

This is just one of many frightening stories about what is becoming a war on our right to grow our own food, know what is in our food, and to choose what we eat and where it comes from.

On December 1, police raided the Stowers’ family home and the adjacent Manna Storehouse Co-Op. They came in armed without announcing that they were police before entering and wound up holding the family, including eight small children for six hours while they searched the premises.

They left with over $10,000 in food, including the family’s personal food supply for the next year, plus their personal computers used for homeschooling their children and communicating with a family member serving in Iraq, and personal cell phones.

At this point you are probably wondering why they were raided by armed officers and treated in such a manner. Meth lab? A large store of weapons and ammo? Slaughtering tourists to sell as “meat” from the co-op? No. They are under investigation for possibly running a retail business without a retail license.

Enough from me. You should read about this for yourself. Here are some links:

The Complaint
Buckeye Institute
Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund
YouTube video of the Stowers telling their story

In August, I wrote about Food Zoning, a completely different aspect of the problem, but still part of the big picture. I will be writing more about these issues soon.

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Food Zoning?

Food Zoning?

I am certainly not one to promote fast food, but this is just creepy and frightening. You can read about it here.

The short version is that Los Angeles is trying to put a moratorium on new fast food restaurants in poor neighborhoods under the guise of creating better food choices for residents.

I’m all for more and better choices, but progress is not achieved by imposing restrictions.

Why not create a plan that focuses on the positive? Encourage gardening, food coops, and offer some kind of incentive to grocers and other food providers. Maybe take some money out of the Wal-Mart fund for that?

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